Ideas Factory

Material

Paper

Paper is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres (most commonly) wood, and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing, printing, packaging, cleaning. It plays such a large part of our everyday lives that we cannot imagine a world without it.

Whilst in the group we experimented with how the weight of the paper affects the strength and versatility. 

Featured on the right is an image of a structure entirely made of paper.

Meticulously cut piece entirely made of paper. The thin lines with uneven edges almost resemble a birds nest.

The Art of Origami, Samuel Ranlett

Slash- Paper under the Knife

This exhibition used paper as a creative medium and source of artistic inspiration, examining the remarkably diverse use of paper in a range of art forms. The exhibition surveys unusual paper treatments, including works that are burned, torn, cut by lasers, and shredded.

As a group, we started with the basics. We created anything we thought of with the raw material, paper. No glue, no tape. Naturally, we went down the route of origami and made things such as paper aeroplanes, 3D stars, hats and chatterboxes. This activity made up aware of the ability paper has when you manipulate it. for example, by playing with the tension and the thickness (strength).

Kumi Yamashita 

At a glance, one could be forgiven for only seeing pretty-coloured crumpled post-it notes. Here, the artist has cleverly worked light to create subtle yet clearly defined shadow profiles. 

Practitioner

Meadham Kirchhoff

Meadham Kirchhoff is a designer label created by Edward Meadham and Benjamin Kirchoff. Both, Central Saint Martin's graduates (2002)  launched their first womenswear collection in 2006 as part of Fashion East in February.

Defining their aesthetic incorporates a classic take on both bourgeois garments and hard street cultures. The continuous ongoing struggle between dark and light develops the label's signature use of toughness against fluidity.

The pair gained recognition for their flamboyant, nonconforming designs and theatrical catwalk productions. 

"How would you describe the worlds of both Meadham Kirchhoff?"
Kirchhoff: "Uncompromising, autonomous and honest."

Meadham Kirchhoff Nail Foils

Nail Rock teamed up with Meadham Kirchhoff to design an exclusive collection of bespoke nail wraps for its spring/summer 2012 show at London Fashion Week. Featured, are only two of ten design. Nine of which portray a 'cute', 'innocent' them. Juxtaposing with the last (featured on the right). A typical Meadham Kirchhoff contrast.

Paper Crown = Fall 2010

Throughout their career, Meadham Kirchhoff continued to challenge mundane conformity through their work.

Process

Print

"The history of printing goes back to the duplication of images by means of stamps in very early times. The use of round seals for rolling an impression into clay tablets goes back to early Mesopotamian civilisation before 3000 BCE, where they are the most common works of art to survive, and feature complex and beautiful images. In both China and Egypt, the use of small stamps for seals preceded the use of larger blocks. In China, India and Europe, the printing of cloth certainly preceded the printing of paper or papyrus. The process is essentially the same - in Europe special presentation impressions of prints were often printed on silk until the seventeenth century. The development of printing has made it possible for books, newspapers, magazines, and other reading materials to be produced in great numbers, and it plays an important role in promoting literacy among the masses."

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